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Summer is over and it's time to get back in business

Now that summer is over and summer vacation is just a faint memory in the past it's time to get back in business. This time I'm writing about boring work days and how I'm going to try to overcome that troubling feeling I'm getting.

Background

For the past four weeks in work the days have been repeating themselves. Every day has been like a repeat from the day before but a bit slower. When this happens it means that work tasks are also repeating the same pattern again and again.

For me this is a bad situation!

I know from the past that this is a situation where I'm getting bored and losing my motivation more and more every day. When I'm losing my motivation at work I know I'm also losing my motivation to do anything useful at my free time.

I knew I had to do something so I wouldn't lose interest to everything and one day I would wake up realizing that I've spent six months browsing netflix.

First step

Probably not the first thing I did but one of the firsts anyway. I told my colleagues that I'm having trouble keeping my motivation up so they know that I'm not at my best performance because I've lost my interest and my thoughts are wandering.

Second step

I decided that I'm going to reverse the situation. By reversing I mean that I'm going get my daily or weekly motivation during my free time and hopefully that will also spike up my work motivation. 

The reverse part one

Just this week I signed up for a online course about scala programming. Few of my colleagues attended this same course a year ago and they all said it was a good course so I decided to give it a try. Learning scala, more than I know now, has been on my todo-list for a long time so this seems like a win-win situation.

The reverse part two

The second part of the reverse was to get back to my blog that got on a good start during the first half of the year. Now that I have started writing again let's just hope I can keep this as a habit.

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